Hong Kong Vaccinations

Immunisation information for patients based in Hong Kong

doctor giving flu shot

Vaccinations are an essential part of preventive healthcare. They help lessen the risk of illnesses while also protect us from the complications of vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccinations work by stimulating your immune system to produce antibodies without causing infection. Depending on the vaccine, your antibody levels often decrease over time, so booster shots are required to re-stimulate your immune memory.

While vaccinations are not required by law in Hong Kong, there is a standardised immunisation schedule that hospitals and private clinics follow. We’ve based the following recommendations from Government and Healthcare bodies.

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COVID-19 Vaccines in Hong Kong

The COVID-19 vaccination program in Hong Kong is voluntary, and individuals can choose which vaccine they wish to take. To learn more about the types of COVID-19 vaccinations available in Hong Kong and which ones can be accessed at OT&P Healthcare, read our dedicated article, which we update continuously.

The SinoVac COVID-19 vaccine is available at the OT&P Clinic

According to the CDC, there is no minimal interval between administering routine vaccines and COVID-19 vaccines but it is advised to have an assessment from a doctor before co-administering.

Why Choose Vaccinations at OT&P?

Full range of
vaccines in stock

Same-day or walk-in
appointment options

Anti-malarial drug
dispense on-site

Blood test for
immunity levels available

Reminders for your
next vaccine dose

Complete vaccination services
(including consultation) with our
family physician

Vaccination Recommendations

Adults
Children
Pregnancy

General Vaccinations

These are only some of the standard vaccinations for adults, please note that this is not an exhaustive list. Please talk to your doctors to get detailed information about vaccines not mentioned here, such as tetanus, varicella and pertussis.

Influenza Vaccine

Seasonal flu shots protect against the three or four influenza viruses that research suggests may be most common during the upcoming season. Everyone of the age of 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every season. The Northern hemisphere vaccine is typically manufactured in time to be available before the winter flu season. It typically arrives in Hong Kong in late September or early October and can be given until Easter, depending on local prevalence.

COVID-19 Vaccine

Vaccination against COVID-19 has been shown to be highly effective in reducing death and disease severity in numerous international studies.

The Hong Kong Government has indicated that individuals can choose which vaccine they wish to take. OT&P will only be able to give Sinovac in our clinics. Both Sinovac and the BioNTech vaccine are available in government vaccination centres. Information about the different vaccines and our analysis of which is the most effective vaccine is available here.

Diphtheria / Tetanus / Acellular Pertussis (dTap) Vaccine
Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccination across the lifespan. Adults should receive a single dose of Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis) if they have never received Tdap. Td (tetanus and diphtheria) or Tdap boosters are recommended every 10 years.
Polio Vaccine

Adults who are at increased risk of exposure to poliovirus (for example, those living in or travelling to a high-risk place) are recommended to receive a booster dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) or an IPV-containing vaccine every 10 years. They can receive this vaccine as part of Tdap-IPV to have protection against other diseases as well.

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccine

MMR vaccine is very effective at protecting people against measles, mumps, and rubella and preventing complications associated with these diseases. Adults should get at least one dose of MMR vaccine. Certain adults with increased risk for measles or mumps transmission should make sure they have had 2 doses completed.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

The hepatitis A vaccine provides long-term protection against hepatitis A. The CDC recommends getting the vaccine as a child, but you should also get vaccinated if you're at risk of contracting the virus, such as living in or travelling to high-risk places such as Hong Kong. You can also choose to receive both hepatitis A and hepatitis B together as a combination vaccine.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. Completing the series of shots is needed to be fully protected. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for those who are living in or travelling to high-risk places such as Hong Kong. You can also choose to receive both hepatitis A and hepatitis B together as a combination vaccine.

Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal disease can cause severe disease, including meningitis and pneumonia, and non-invasive disease such as otitis media. The vaccine can protect you from such disease and its complications. It is suitable for adults above the age of 50. There are 2 types of pneumococcal vaccines available which is 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (23vPPV). High risk individuals are recommended to have a single dose of PCV13, followed by a single dose of 23vPPV after one year.

Shingles Vaccine

Shingle vaccination is the only way to protect against shingles and its complication such as postherpetic neuralgia. CDC recommends healthy adults 50 years and older to have 2 doses of shingle vaccine called Shingrix. It is shown to have strong protection against shingles with more than 90% effectiveness. Shingrix is now available at OT&P.

General Vaccinations

According to the Department of Health's Hong Kong Childhood Immunisation Programme (HKCIP), below are the recommendations of vaccines for children in Hong Kong. For more vaccine recommendations, visit our blog here.

Diphtheria Vaccine
  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccination across the lifespan.  Babies need 3 shots of DTaP to build up high levels of protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough (at age of 2, 4 and 6 months). Young children then need 2 booster shots to maintain that protection through early childhood (at the age of 15-18 months, 4-6 years). At the age of 11-12 years, it is recommended to have another booster shot of Tdap (reduced dosage of diphtheria and whooping cough) 
Tetanus Vaccine

CDC recommends diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccination across the lifespan. Babies need 3 shots of DTaP to build up high levels of protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough (at age of 2, 4 and 6 months). Young children then need 2 booster shots to maintain that protection through early childhood (at the age of 15-18 months, 4-6 years). At the age of 11-12 years, it is recommended to have another booster shot of Tdap (reduced dosage of diphtheria and whooping cough)

Polio Vaccine

Inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is the only polio vaccine that has been given in Hong Kong. CDC recommends that children get four doses of polio vaccine. They should get one dose at each of the following ages: 2 months old, 4 months old, 6 through 18 months old, and 4 through 6 years old.

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccine

Children should get two doses of MMR vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 to 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

The hepatitis B vaccine is safe and effective. In Hong Kong, hepatitis B vaccine is included in the Hong Kong Childhood Immunisation Program. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all babies and children. The standard vaccination timing for full term babies is at birth, 1 month of age, and 6 months of age.

Pneumococcal (13 serotypes) Vaccine

CDC recommends routine administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) for all children younger than 2 years of age. The vaccine is a series of 4 doses given at the age of 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 12 through 15 months.

Meningococcal B Vaccine

Meningococcal B vaccine can reduce risk of meningococcal serogroup B infection. It can be offered to babies and young children under 2 years old, and adolescents aged 15-19 years.

Rotavirus Vaccine

The first dose of rotavirus vaccine should be given before a child is 15 weeks of age and all doses should be completed before they turn 8 months of age. The routine schedule for rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix) is given in 2 doses at 2 months and 4 months of age. The vaccine is given by putting drops in the infants’ mouth.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

The best way to prevent hepatitis A is through vaccination with hepatitis A vaccine. It is recommended for all children aged 12-23 months and those below the age of 18 who have not previously received hepatitis A vaccine (“catch up vaccination”). The vaccine is a 2-dose course given 6 months apart and completion of both doses is needed for long-term protection against hepatitis A.

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) Vaccine

CDC recommends Hib vaccination for all children younger than 5 years old. Older children and adults usually do not need a Hib vaccine, unless they have certain medical conditions. The standard vaccination schedule is given in 4 doses at the age of 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 12-15 months.

Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine

Chickenpox is a highly contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus. Children are routinely recommended to receive the first dose of chickenpox vaccine at age 12 through 15 months and the second dose at age 4 through 6 years. For those above age of 13 years who have never had chickenpox or received chickenpox vaccine should get 2 doses with at least 28 days apart.

Influenza Vaccine

Seasonal flu shots protect against the three or four influenza viruses that research suggests may be most common during the upcoming season. Everyone of the age of 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every season. The Northern hemisphere vaccine is typically manufactured in time to be available before the winter flu season. It typically arrives in Hong Kong in late September or early October and can be given until Easter, depending on local prevalence. Intranasal flu vaccines are also available at OT&P to provide a pain-free option for children.

HPV Vaccine (Gardasil 9)

The HPV vaccine, also known as Gardasil 9, is a vaccine that protects the body against human papillomavirus (HPV).

Two doses of the HPV vaccine are recommended for all boys and girls at ages 11–12, but the vaccine can be given as early as age 9. If individuals wait until they're older, they may need three doses instead of two.

General Vaccinations

Pregnant women should get vaccinated to protect themselves and their baby. Vaccines also provide your baby with immunity during the first few months of life. Below are the vaccinations commonly recommended for pregnant women:

Please note: Pregnant women should consult a doctor for professional advice before getting any vaccinations.

Pertussis Vaccine

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, can be life-threatening, especially for newborn babies. The CDC recommends receiving the vaccine during gestation of 27-36 weeks. To-be-fathers, grandparents and newborn caretakers are also advised to have a booster shot.

Influenza Vaccine

The best way to protect against the flu and protect your baby for several months after birth from flu-related complications is to get the flu shot. Pregnant women can get the flu shot anytime during each pregnancy.

Vaccinations for Travel Health

The most important step before international travel is seeing your healthcare professional for a travel risk assessment. Some vaccination courses, for example, hepatitis A requires two multiple doses separated over months. It is, therefore, preferable to arrange your initial consultation 1-2 months before travel, especially if you are considering a trip to a high-risk region.

Compiled below is an overview of vaccinations we recommend when travelling abroad. Each country will have their specific requirements.  f you are unsure of the vaccines you need for your trip, discuss your travel plans with your family doctor for accurate recommendations.

Asia

Some countries may recommend additional vaccines such as:

  • Typhoid
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • Rabies
North America
South America

Some countries may recommend additional vaccines such as:

  • Typhoid
  • Yellow Fever
Europe & Russia

Some countries may recommend additional vaccines such as:

  • Rabies
  • Tick-borne Encephalitis
Middle East
  • COVID-19
  • Influenza
  • Tdap
  • MMR
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Typhoid

Some Countries may recommend additional vaccines such as:

  • Men ACWY
Africa
  • COVID-19
  • Influenza
  • Polio
  • MMR
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Typhoid

Some countries may recommend additional vaccines such as:

  • Yellow Fever
  • Men ACWY
  • Cholera

Consult a Doctor

OT&P Healthcare offers tailored vaccination services and advice for patients based in Hong Kong and abroad. Including consultations on the immunisation schedule for adults and children and a wide variety of vaccinations.

Frequently Asked Questions

How many vaccines does a newborn get?

According to the Hong Kong Childhood Immunisation Programme (HKCIP), it is recommended for newborns to receive the BCG vaccine and Hepatitis B vaccine (First Dose).

To learn more about the immunisation schedule in Hong Kong for newborns and children, read our article here.

What is the immunisation schedule for a child?

Vaccinations are not required by law in Hong Kong, but there is a standardised immunisation schedule that hospitals and private clinics follow.

To learn more about the entire immunisation schedule and recommendations for children in Hong Kong, read our article or use our vaccination calculator.

What vaccines should adults routinely receive?

In Hong Kong, it is recommended by the government for all adults to receive an annual flu shot. The vaccine typically arrives in Hong Kong in late September or early October and can be given until Easter, depending on the local prevalence.

Please read our complete immunisation guide for adults in Hong Kong or use our vaccine calculator to get a free, personalised immunisation schedule report.

How often should I vaccinate?

Your immunisation schedule depends on many factors, including where you live, your work environment, whether you travel frequently, and more. Adults in Hong Kong should receive a flu shot annually, while other vaccinations will depend on their age and needs.

To learn about all vaccines available for adults in Hong Kong, visit our guide here. To get a free, personalised immunisation schedule report, click here.

Does insurance cover immunisation in Hong Kong?

OT&P Healthcare has direct billing arrangements with many international and local insurance companies.

We accept many major insurance cards; however, we ask you to check with us to confirm. For more information, please enquire through Tel: 2155 9533 or email business@otandp.com

Our International Standards & Accreditations

ACHS accreditation is endorsed by the International Society for Quality in Health Care (ISQua), the body that oversees healthcare standards worldwide, including the USA and UK. OT&P Healthcare is the only ACHS Accredited clinic in Hong Kong.

This means that our efficient medical systems are designed to ensure that all medications and vaccines are transported and stored safely. All the vaccinations are stored in pharmaceutical fridges and humidity is measured on a regular basis.

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