Hong Kong Vaccinations

Immunisation information for patients based in Hong Kong

doctor giving flu shot

Vaccinations are an essential part of preventive healthcare. They help lessen the risk of illnesses while also protect us from the complications of vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccinations work by stimulating your immune system to produce antibodies without causing infection. Depending on the vaccine, your antibody levels often decrease over time, so booster shots are required to re-stimulate your immune memory.

While vaccinations are not required by law in Hong Kong, there is a standardised immunisation schedule that hospitals and private clinics follow. We’ve based the following recommendations from Government and Healthcare bodies.

Book an Appointment

Which Vaccines Do I Need?

Get a free, personalised immunisation schedule with our vaccine calculator.

COVID-19 Vaccines in Hong Kong

The COVID-19 vaccination program in Hong Kong is voluntary, and individuals can choose which vaccine they wish to take. To learn more about the types of COVID-19 vaccinations available in Hong Kong and which ones can be accessed at OT&P Healthcare, read our dedicated article, which we update continuously.

The SinoVac COVID-19 vaccine is available at the OT&P Clinic

Please note: COVID-19 vaccines should routinely be administered alone, with a minimum interval of 14 days before or after administering any other vaccine.

Register

Why Choose Vaccinations at OT&P?

Full range of
vaccines in stock

Same-day or walk-in
appointment options

Anti-malarial drug
dispense on-site

Blood test for
immunity levels available

Reminders for your
next vaccine dose

Complete vaccination services
(including consultation) with our
family physician

Vaccination Recommendations

Adults
Children
Pregnancy

General Vaccinations

These are only some of the standard vaccinations for adults, please note that this is not an exhaustive list. Please talk to your doctors to get detailed information about vaccines not mentioned here, such as tetanus, varicella and pertussis.

Annual Flu Vaccine

The flu vaccine helps the body to develop antibodies against several strains of the flu virus. Ideally, you should get the flu shot every year to protect yourself from the different strains of flu.

The Northern hemisphere vaccine is typically manufactured in time to be available before the winter flu season. It typically arrives in Hong Kong in late September or early October and can be given until Easter, depending on the local prevalence. You should not get a flu shot if you have a history of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) or if you previously had severe reactions to the flu vaccine.

HPV Vaccine (Gardasil 9)

The HPV vaccine, also known as Gardasil 9, is a vaccine that protects the body against human papillomavirus (HPV).

Two doses of the HPV vaccine are recommended for all boys and girls at ages 11–12, but the vaccine can be given as early as age 9. If individuals wait until they're older, they may need three doses instead of two.

The HPV vaccination is also recommended for everyone through age 26 years if not vaccinated already.

Tetanus Vaccination

There are different types of tetanus vaccines. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), young children receive DTaP vaccines combined with diphtheria, pertussis and polio vaccines in their vaccination schedules.

Tdap vaccines are recommended for preteens around 11-12 years old. Td or Tdap vaccine boosters are advised for adults every ten years to maintain protection.

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccine

Measles is a highly infectious disease that can lead to significant complications in some cases. Hong Kong adults born between 1967 and 2002 who have not been immunised against measles are eligible for free MMR vaccines under the government's vaccination programme. However, if you are severely ill or have had an allergy to a previous dose of MMR, consult a doctor before getting the vaccine.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

The hepatitis A vaccine provides long-term protection against hepatitis A. The CDC recommends getting the vaccine as a child, but you should also get vaccinated if you're at risk of contracting the virus, such as having a partner with the virus or frequently travelling to countries where it's common.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

The hepatitis B vaccine, also known as Engerix B, protects against the hepatitis B virus. The CDC recommends receiving this vaccine as a child, but you should also get it if you are at risk, such as having multiple sexual partners or living with someone with a chronic infection. You shouldn't get the vaccine if you are suffering from a severe illness or have a history of hypersensitivity to yeast.

Pneumococcal Vaccine

This vaccine prevents pneumococcal disease, as well as some cases of pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. There are two types of the vaccine (13 and 23 strains).

The vaccines are given to children and recommended for those over 50 years old or those with high-risk conditions (such as immunocompromised states, diabetes, chronic heart/liver/lung or kidney disease). Depending on your age and medical history, you will have to discuss with your doctor if you need to get one or both of these vaccines.

General Vaccinations

According to the Department of Health's Hong Kong Childhood Immunisation Programme (HKCIP), below are the recommendations of vaccines for children in Hong Kong. For more vaccine recommendations, visit our blog here.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

The hepatitis B vaccine, also known as Engerix B, protects against the hepatitis B virus. The CDC recommends receiving this vaccine as a child.

HPV Vaccine (Gardasil 9)

The HPV vaccine, also known as Gardasil 9, is a vaccine that protects the body against human papillomavirus (HPV).

Two doses of the HPV vaccine are recommended for all boys and girls at ages 11–12, but the vaccine can be given as early as age 9. If individuals wait until they're older, they may need three doses instead of two.

Tetanus Vaccination

There are different types of tetanus vaccines. According to the CDC, young children receive DTaP vaccines combined with diphtheria, pertussis and polio vaccines in their vaccination schedules.

Tdap vaccines are recommended for preteens around 11-12 years old.

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccine

The MMR vaccine protects against measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (chickenpox). The CDC recommends children get the first dose of the MMR vaccine at 12 months of age and the second dose at age 4 through to 6.

General Vaccinations

Pregnant women should get vaccinated to protect themselves and their baby. Vaccines also provide your baby with immunity during the first few months of life. Below are the vaccinations commonly recommended for pregnant women:

Please note: Pregnant women should consult a doctor for professional advice before getting any vaccinations.

Pertussis Vaccine

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, can be life-threatening, especially for newborn babies. The CDC recommends receiving the vaccine during gestation of 27-36 weeks. To-be-fathers, grandparents and newborn caretakers are also advised to have a booster shot.

Annual Flu Vaccine

The best way to protect against the flu and protect your baby for several months after birth from flu-related complications is to get the flu shot. Pregnant women can get the flu shot anytime during each pregnancy.

Vaccinations for Travel Health

The most important step before international travel is seeing your healthcare professional for a travel risk assessment. Some vaccination courses, for example, hepatitis A requires two multiple doses separated over months. It is, therefore, preferable to arrange your initial consultation 1-2 months before travel, especially if you are considering a trip to a high-risk region.

Compiled below is an overview of vaccinations we recommend when travelling abroad. If you are unsure of the vaccines you need for your trip, discuss your travel plans with your family doctor for accurate recommendations.

Map of Travel Vaccines

Asia

  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • Rabies
  • Hepatitis A
  • Typhoid

North America

  • Yellow Fever
  • Typhoid

South America

  • Rabies
  • Hepatitis A
  • Yellow Fever

Europe

  • Diphtheria
  • Polio

Mediterranean & Middle East

  • Rabies
  • Hepatitis A
  • Typhoid

Africa

  • Rabies
  • Polio
  • Men ACWY
  • Hepatitis A
  • Yellow Fever
  • Typhoid

Consult a Doctor

OT&P Healthcare offers tailored vaccination services and advice for patients based in Hong Kong and abroad. Including consultations on the immunisation schedule for adults and children and a wide variety of vaccinations.

Frequently Asked Questions

How many vaccines does a newborn get?

According to the Hong Kong Childhood Immunisation Programme (HKCIP), it is recommended for newborns to receive the BCG vaccine and Hepatitis B vaccine (First Dose).

To learn more about the immunisation schedule in Hong Kong for newborns and children, read our article here.

What is the immunisation schedule for a child?

Vaccinations are not required by law in Hong Kong, but there is a standardised immunisation schedule that hospitals and private clinics follow.

To learn more about the entire immunisation schedule and recommendations for children in Hong Kong, read our article or use our vaccination calculator.

What vaccines should adults routinely receive?

In Hong Kong, it is recommended by the government for all adults to receive an annual flu shot. The vaccine typically arrives in Hong Kong in late September or early October and can be given until Easter, depending on the local prevalence.

Please read our complete immunisation guide for adults in Hong Kong or use our vaccine calculator to get a free, personalised immunisation schedule report.

How often should I vaccinate?

Your immunisation schedule depends on many factors, including where you live, your work environment, whether you travel frequently, and more. Adults in Hong Kong should receive a flu shot annually, while other vaccinations will depend on their age and needs.

To learn about all vaccines available for adults in Hong Kong, visit our guide here. To get a free, personalised immunisation schedule report, click here.

Does insurance cover immunisation in Hong Kong?

OT&P Healthcare has direct billing arrangements with many international and local insurance companies.

We accept many major insurance cards; however, we ask you to check with us to confirm. For more information, please enquire through Tel: 2155 9533 or email business@otandp.com

Our International Standards & Accreditations

ACHS accreditation is endorsed by the International Society for Quality in Health Care (ISQua), the body that oversees healthcare standards worldwide, including the USA and UK. OT&P Healthcare is the only ACHS Accredited clinic in Hong Kong.

This means that our efficient medical systems are designed to ensure that all medications and vaccines are transported and stored safely. All the vaccinations are stored in pharmaceutical fridges and humidity is measured on a regular basis.

Our Doctors

Make Informed Health Decisions

Read Our Recent Hong Kong Heathcare Blogs